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Fourier Imaging Microscopy  new dev see the interesting paper from

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Fourier plane imaging microscopy.

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These days the compound microscope is nearly as ubiquitous in physics and materials science labs as in biology and medical venues. ln its simplest form, the instrument uses two-stage magnification once with an objective lens close to the sample and once again with the eyepiece. The resulting image is formed at the real focal plane where we typically place our eye or a camera; its resolution is determined by the well-known Rayleigh diffraction limit, though various tricks can be employed to improve the resolution somewhat.  A very different image appeared at the Fourier plane, however, with some diffraction information clearly visible (top image, for a 250-nm PC). By carefully extrapolating the arcs into full diffraction rings, the physicists could reconstruct a real-plane image with the correct periodicity (bottom). The technique seems robust and can work for non-periodic samples, although the origins of the Fourier-plane details are still under investigation. (O. Dominguez et al., J. Appl. Phys. 116, 103102,2014 and 20,November 2014 physics today or seewww-physicstoday.org

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 D.Dominguez et al  J. Appl. Phys.. 116, 103102,2014.

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 You arelogoEmrs invited to join the ”Current Trends in Optical and X-Ray Metrology of Advanced Materials for Nanoscale Devices IV” EMRS 2015 Spring Meeting (May 11-15, 2015) Lille, France

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from Mircea Modreanu Staff Researcher at Tyndall National Institute

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You are invited to join the ”Current Trends in Optical and X-Ray Metrology of Advanced Materials for Nanoscale Devices IV” EMRS 2015 Spring Meeting (May 11-15, 2015) Lille, France. This E-MRS symposium is aimed to:
• give an overview of the current status of optical and x-ray metrology for materials characterization and quality assurance of thin films, layer-structured materials, and one-dimensional nanomaterials, with a particular emphasis on state-of-the-art metrology
• promote and encourage the interaction between academic and industrial research (instrument manufacture, IC and optoelectronics industry and materials suppliers) to address scientific and technological challenges associated with the improvement of standard analytical methods and qualification of newer techniques.
The current trends in optical metrology mainly concern spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), polarisation and modulation spectroscopy, anisotropic reflectance and Near Field Optical Microscopy (nanoRaman).

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Paul Drude Ellipsometry workShop ( feb 2011) program and IC FCMN 2011 (may 2011) presentation available today see The News Section...

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